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Glossary of Investment Terms

 

R

 

Record Date

 

Date on which a shareholder must officially own shares in order to be paid a dividend.

 

 

 

Redeem

 

To cash in mutual fund shares by selling them back to the fund. Deferred sales charges may apply.

 

 

 

Refund Bonds

 

Retirement of an existing bond issue through the sale of a new bond issue.

 

 

 

Regulation T

 

Federal Reserve Board regulation covering the extension of credit to customers by securities brokers, dealers, and members of the national securities exchanges. It establishes initial margin requirements and defines registered, unregistered and exempt securities. Currently, Regulation T requires that a customer pay for 50% of an initial purchase with their own funds.

 

 

 

Retail Notes

 

Weekly corporate offerings designed to allow the investing public to purchase original issue corporate bonds directly from major US corporations.

 

 

 

Revenue Bonds

 

Bond issued to finance public works such as bridges or tunnels or sewer systems and supported directly by the revenues of the project.

 

 

 

Reverse Stock Split

 

Procedure whereby a corporation reduces the number of shares outstanding. The total number of shares will have the same market value immediately after the reverse split as before it, but each share will be worth more.

 

 

 

Rights of Accumulation

 

Regarding mutual funds. Discount on future purchases once a break point is reached.

 

 

 

Rollover

 

A tax-free movement of cash or other assets from one retirement plan to another. A rollover may occur between like IRA's, or between a tax-sheltered annuity or QRP and a Traditional IRA. With a rollover, usually the IRA holder receives the money or property before rolling it into an IRA. A rollover is a reportable transaction.

 

 

 

Roth IRA

 

IRA created by the Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997 permitting account holders to allow their capital to accumulate tax free under certain conditions. Participants do not get the deductions for contributions made. However, earnings and principal can be withdrawn completely tax free after age 59 as long as the assets have remained in the IRA for at least 5 years after making the first contribution. Income and other limitations apply.

 

 

 

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